Training for your adventure

Training for your adventure

Taking on big treks can be hard work without at least a little pre-trip training. Here are some top tips for getting ready for mountain adventures. Get walking! There's no time like the present to start. The best way to train for a long walk is to get out and do some long walks. Start slowly at first, taking on shorter walks on easier terrain, gradually increasing the distance as you get more comfortable. Once your distance starts to increase, you can also step it up (forgive the pun) by heading for trails, and better yet, some steeper slopes. Include other leg based exercises. Cycling is a great way to build up stamina in the legs, and if you're at the gym, try and throw in some squats and lunges to build up the muscle strength in your legs. Change your routine. When you're out and about, avoid the lift or escalator where possible, try and use the stairs at every opportunity! Mind endurance training. Make sure to get out whatever the weather. This not only means you keep up your physical training, but it will also help you become more comfortable at walking in adverse conditions. On longer treks, avoiding rain and cold may not be an option, so get out in it and familiarise yourself with your equipment, and identify any weak points ahead of time. Add a little weight. If you're going on a long hike, carrying a bit in your pack is inevitable, so training with one will help to build up shoulder muscles and stamina. Even if you don't need to, or don't expect to carry much weight, it is worth adding a little extra anyway as it will help to build your leg muscles up too. Try out walking poles. Walking poles are great for stability and balance on rough and uneven terrain. They can also relieve the pressure on your legs by getting your arms involved, however, this means it is worth using poles ahead of time to train your arms ready for the walk. Poles aren't for everyone, so try to borrow a pair to test them out beforehand. Get good footwear. It's important to have good footwear when taking on long trails, as it is equally important to train in good, supportive footwear ahead of your hike. Boots will support your ankles, reducing the chance of a twist or trip. Boots can be a bit heavier and more rigid than a pair of trainers, so it is important to break them in ahead of your trip. Stay fuelled. Make sure you eat healthy, energising snacks during your hikes. Water is also very important, and on hikes at altitude staying hydrated can help with the effects of AMS. Eat nuts, dried fruit, chocolate and muesli bars for a quick source of energy and protein. Remember to try and use a reusable bottle as you trek, especially as they can often be filled up along the way at lunch stops or by using sterilisers in stream water. Feeling ready to go? Click here to take on one of our mountain skills courses, or here to embark on a guided trek in Snowdonia, or if you're after the really big peaks, click here to check out our Himalayan adventures!

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